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11/30/2007

Two kings and their war on a mother's gag reflex

by Jeremy Hooper

"I saw them at the altar and I said, 'This can't be what I'm thinking,'' ...''I was sick.''

If you saw this quote out of context, what would you think was being described by the mother who offered it? Perhaps it would call to mind a situation in which vandals go to a church altar and debase it with epithets? Maybe you'd think it was describing a couple who went to the altar to get hitched, but instead started making loud love right then and there? Or what about a scenario wherein a church choir went to the altar ostensibly to sing, "Hail Holy Queen," yet instead chose to belt out a rousing rendition of "(Closer To God) I Want to F**k You Like An Animal"?

All possibilities. Unfortunately, however, the above quote is not being used to describe any of those things, but rather the penultimate scene of the children's book King & King, wherein the two princes in the tale seal their love with a vow of monogamy. And the quote's speaker is Pennsylvania mother Eilieen Issa who, with her husband, is trying to have the book pulled from her local public library. Read more at link:

Children's book outrages parents [Morning Call]

Books-1Fortunately, the Issa family has had their request denied on multiple occasions by the Lower Macungie Library's board of directors, and most everyone involve agrees that (a) pulling or even restricting the book would be grossly unconstitutional, and (b) it's the parents' job, not the library's, to choose what their children read. Because, of course, while man-man love may bring Ms. Issa to a vomitous state, many of the rest of us are not only happy to let our children see that such couples exist in nature, but we actually feel like it is our duty as parents to de-stigmatize such relationships before society's long-held prejudices have the first chance to take hold within the impressionable child's mind!

So Ms. Issa, go ahead and teach your child that gagging is the appropriate reaction to seeing two dudes sealing their love at an altar. We'll continue to teach ours that the truly nauseating thing would be for a gay couple to look down from their wedding altar and see that their love is leading one of their attendees to a place of protest. We'll let society decide whose mindset is most conducive to a world of peace and respect.

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Your thoughts

I wonder how she'd feel if I wanted a Christian parenting book or the Bible pulled from the library because, to me, it teaches "gross practices such as stoning people to death, hate, intolerance and that shellfish are not a tasty delight of the sea"

Why not ban all books, while we're at it. Farenheit 451 style. Way to go mother of idiocy.

Posted by: Stef | Nov 30, 2007 12:44:34 PM

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