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07/27/2010

Video: Involvement = yes. Theocracy = no.

by Jeremy Hooper

The Focus on the Family boys focus on Christians in politics, yet they ask the wrong fundamental question:


[SOURCE]

Their question: "Should Christians be involved in politics?" And of course the obvious answer to that is yes. All Americans should be involved in the process in some way. At the very least informed about what's going on.

But the major oversight -- the one that has divided American politics for the past several decades -- lies in framing of this question itself. Because for their purposes, what Stuart and Tom should instead be asking is: "Should Christians get a church-state-mixing pass that no other religious or civil group is given, one that allows them to legislate their version of morality and discriminate in the civil sector?" And the (should-be) obvious answer to that is a big, fat, resounding NO! Nobody should be overreaching on the basis of their personally-held faith views in a way that turns basic, constitutional fairness and equality into an undeserved debate. So in short: No group should be doing exactly what Focus on the Family has been doing for over three decades.

Groups like FoTF have created a world where "Christian" means only one socially conservative thing, where "politics" is a game that must always come with contrived "culture war" asides, and where "involved" means shaping the world so that it bends decidedly towards evangelical favoritism. Their fight is one that seeks to have many groups, chief among them LGBT people, subjugated by the "values" that the religious right has decided to focus on at this particular time in history. With an answer like that, you'll have to forgive us if we see ourselves as the ones who deserve to ask the questions.

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