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03/05/2012

For @vote4marriageNC, Sunday church service = tour stop

by Jeremy Hooper

Check out this tweet from the campaign that's trying to put a CIVIL marriage equality ban into North Carolina's constitution:

Screen Shot 2012-03-05 At 9.03.45 Am

Okay, so FBC = First Baptist Church. The above pic is from the 10:30, main service of one of Charlotte's Baptist churches. On a Sunday. In the south. It's pretty much a guarantee that FBC is going to draw in HUGE crowd any and every Sunday.

But the fact of the matter is that there is no sunlight between the "Vote For Marriage NC" campaign and the local church network. Perhaps more than any other campaign I've ever witnessed, this attempt to halt LGBT people's civil rights is relying almost exclusively on church outreach. So why should they see any difference between a Sunday service and a campaign tour stop? For this campaign, these services are campaign rallies (Tony Perkins spoke at the pictured service), and every congregant is an assumed, unquestioning supporter. The Vote For Marriage NC folks see no need to make a distinction because the truth is that they see no distinction between their church beliefs and their state's public policy.

Civil licensing vs. religious ceremony? Same diff.
Preaching vs. lobbying? One and the same.
Campaign finance vs. collection plates? Tomato, tomahto.

It blows my minds that this is still considered okay. Blows my mind even more that so many people -- including, and perhaps especially, people of faith -- fail to see why respect for these bounds and lines are the only way for us to move forward, with the otherwise implications posing threats that extend well beyond Joe and Bob's legal union.

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