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04/25/2012

Video: Bryan Fischer's callers convince him his CNN appearance was beneficial

by Jeremy Hooper

At the end of this clip, noted voice of extremism Bryan Fischer says something really revelatory. The visible and right-connected AFA personality admits that even many diehard conservatives are quite troubled by what Bryan sees as good punditry, but what the world increasingly (and rightly) sees as nasty, unhelpful, deeply offensive attacks:

I had this same conversation yesterday with several people from carried walks of life. Even objectively, I seriously can't see any way that Bryan Fischer's CNN appearance benefited anyone except those of us who are hoping to connect some crucial dots about anti-LGBT activism. For the Romney campaign, it showed how truly nasty anti-LGBT social conservatism can and does get (which is an extremely pertinent point since Romney will soon speak at the most anti-LGBT, socially conservative college in America). For the AFA, it showed the laughability of the claims that the organization is geared towards "pro-family" rather than anti-gay politics. For other socially conservative pundits, it showed how important it is to hold these figureheads accountable for the deeply divisive rhetoric that they so routinely use (something most of them fear).

But for LGBT Americans, while the mere fact that this kind of thing still happens on American television at all comes across as a complete and utter negative, the fact that it happened the way it did does help us show the public how nasty it can get. I seriously do applaud Bryan Fischer for having the spine to actually stand for what he believes and say on CNN the same kind of thing that he says on his own show (which is exactly what projects like the GLAAD Commentator Accountability Project want to see more of). That said, he must now have enough fortitude to admit that he is pushing a message that is most likely a liability to the GOP from here on out. We do not live in Bryan Fischer's America—not anymore. We will not return to Bryan Fischer's America—never again. If the GOP embraces his tone, then that will come at the expense of the party's growth and future relevancy. If the GOP rejects his tone, it will force social conservatives to make crucial choices about where they stand, where they draw the line, and whether they will even vote this cycle.

Fischer is forcing some interesting national conversation. I just don't see how any objective voice (a.k.a not one of Bryan's callers) could deny that LGBT activists and allies benefits from having him out there.

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