RECENT  POSTS:  » Video: Voices from our pro-equality future (present?) » Anti-gay orgs continue to offend children of single parents, gay parents, more » Apple CEO gives 'substantial' sum to HRC's southern state project; may or may not have used ApplePay » Conservative proposes new way for vendors to tell gay customers they don't care for them » NOM versus David Koch » Anti-equality baseball player calls reporter 'a prick' for asking about his anti-equality advocacy » Audio: Josh Duggar defends discrimination, invalidates own point » Audio: AFA's Fischer names 'homosexual agenda' as 'greatest threat to liberty' in American history » Audio: AFA Radio caller calls for executing gays; FRC-employed host doesn't even challenge him, much less condemn » NOM president's other organization is 'in trouble' (his words) too  

« Go back a post || Return to G-A-Y homepage || Haul tail to next post »

07/19/2012

'Vito': The man, the mirth, the movement

by Jeremy Hooper

I didn't know that much about Vito Russo. For me it was always television rather than film, so even though I both read and saw the subsequent Celluloid Closet documentary (the latter secretly, while my parents were out to dinner), I didn't gravitate to it in a way that necessarily heightened my perception of its creator.

I do, however, know plenty about the 20th century's LGBT rights arc. I was somewhat obsessed with post-WW2 Baby Boomer culture all through my youth, leading to routine proclamations about me "being born in the wrong era." This continued when I came into the LGBT activism realm, at which point I devoured anything I could consume that pertained to the Stonewall generation.

It's through this latter lens that I both viewed and appreciated the new documentary "Vito." For me it is not so much the story of one man as it is the story of one triumphant fight projected onto/channeled through this one key figure. We all know that the political most always benefits from personal stories, something that is especially true in a fight as human as ours. We know that our stories our are most powerful tools. In "Vito," we see this truism explored in overdrive—the tale of a burgeoning LGBT rights movement, told through a man who experienced led so many of its 20th century touchstones.

Vito's bona fides speak for themselves; his choice to speak out guided (and continues to guide in many real ways) our ongoing push forward.

"Vito." Monday night. HBO. Watch it:

space gay-comment gay-G-A-Y-post gay-email gay-writer-jeremy-hooper


Your thoughts

comments powered by Disqus

G-A-Y Comments Policy


 
Related Posts with Thumbnails