RECENT  POSTS:  » Video: AFA's Fischer urges FLOTUS to fight obesity by fighting lesbians' sexual orientation » Um, but he lost to another pro-equality candidate, Tony » Video: Man misapplies personal trauma to sexual orientation science » WND's editor fundamentally misunderstands nondiscrimination law (part 3 of 3) » Video: Why is this shockingly anti-gay (among other things) speech happening in a Connecticut public school? » Fined NY event space to host same-sex wedding receptions (*but no ceremonies for anyone) » Another day, another far-right pastor pushing Christians to civil war » Joseph Farah still clueless about nondiscrimination law » Hobby Lobby president to join extremely anti-gay activists at 'Star Spangled' event » FRC's Sprigg admits his side put up 'weak defense' in 7th Circuit  

« Go back a post || Return to G-A-Y homepage || Haul tail to next post »

12/05/2013

'They are going to hate us': How an aggressive anti-LGBT movement 'justifies' radical discrimination

by Jeremy Hooper

Of all of the lines that the anti-LGBT conservatives use to "justify" their radical push for discrimination, this kind of thing might just annoy me the most:

Screen Shot 2013-12-05 At 9.01.29 Am
[Via Matt Barber's twitter feed]

I hear social conservatives say it all the time. "We are going to be hated the way Christ was hated." The idea is that the pro-equality movement's pushback and scrutiny means they are doing something good. Something biblical. Something right.

But they are wrong. The truth is that these anti-LGBT figures bring this wave of resistance on themselves, and they could alleviate it if they wanted to. They just don't want to. They want to continue to deny and demean LGBT people, because their ingrained biases tell them to do so, while also soothing their own souls by telling themselves that other people's heartbreak/disgust/resistance is a foregone conclusion.

It's yet another "win-win" tactic, one of many that the pointed and determined discriminators of America use to make their radical agenda seem like anything other than what it is. This movement has workshopped lines to take the onus off of every one of their rights-depriving acts. They say they are simply "loving the sinner and hating the sin" so that they can pretend their cause is geared toward actions and not people. They claim they are "protecting" marriage and family rather than denying those concepts to others so that they can act as if their votes against certain kinds of taxpayers are morally sanctified acts in favor of virtue. They use lines like, "we know who wins in the end" so that they can salve over the hopeless feeling they experience whenever they realize that LGBT equality is inevitable. And yes, they claim that "people are going to hate us" because it allows them to shirk responsibility for the chosen acts of antagonism that provoked the pushback.

It's elementary-level obvious. And while this fanciful game of faux justification might have some efficacy when it comes to how well these chosen discriminators of America sleep at night, it does nothing to change the common understanding that does (and increasingly will) surround this modern civil rights debate. History sees and understands what it really going on; the history books know that the side that claims to be "hated" is the team that could have stopped it all from happening.

space gay-comment gay-G-A-Y-post gay-email gay-writer-jeremy-hooper


Your thoughts

comments powered by Disqus

G-A-Y Comments Policy


 
Related Posts with Thumbnails