RECENT  POSTS:  » Idaho wedding venue can be discriminatory so long as it sticks to new business model » Sunday in Houston: Activists mad that churches were noted for their politicization head to a church—to politicize » Lisa Kudrow thinks my website title is modest, at best » Do you take this man to be your lawfully wedded mission of destruction? » MassResistance's hilarious fourteen-point plan for reinstating marriage discrimination: Get really, really nasty » Concerned Women For America finally learns to call out anti-gay rhetoric » 'Rivka Edelman' responds to me via one of the most bizarre comments I've ever read » Just going to another vendor isn't always easy, isn't good basis for sound policy » Pat Robertson: People who believe in fair nondiscrimination law are 'terrorists, radicals, and extremists' » In which another anti-gay group forces politicos to Gladys Kravitz our way into one family's divorce drama  

« Go back a post || Return to G-A-Y homepage || Haul tail to next post »

04/03/2014

No, Brendan Eich did not hold the same position as then-candidate Obama. Stop saying that.

by Jeremy Hooper

President Obama, while U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Obama, was on record as opposed to Proposition 8. He called it "divisive and discriminatory;" he called it "unnecessary" and "not what America's about."

Brendan Eich, the now-resigned Mozilla CEO, gave $1000 to Proposition 8. He supported it. He worked to pass it.

Yet in the hours since Eich announced his resignation, I've seen numerous conservatives claim that Eich held the same exact position as then-candidate Obama back in '08. Here's one from the Heritage Foundation's Ryan T. Anderson:

The outrageous response is the result of one private, personal campaign contribution to support marriage as a male-female union, a view affirmed at the time by President Barack Obama, then-Sen. Hillary Clinton, and countless other prominent officials. After all, Prop 8 passed with the support of 7 million California voters.

So was President Obama a bigot back when he supported marriage as the union of a man and woman? And is characterizing political disagreement on this issue—no matter how thoughtfully expressed—as hate speech really the way to find common ground and peaceful co-existence? [
Heritage]

Or there's this, which gives you the gist of a meme that's all over the right side of Twitter:

Screen Shot 2014-04-03 At 6.01.33 Pm-1

Well look, President Obama was certainly wrong on marriage, something he himself now realizes. And I was the first to criticize Senators Obama and Clinton for those earlier (unevolved?) stances. But the fact of the matter is that the Democratic candidates (and most Dems in general) opposed the abject and unconstituional nastiness that was and is Proposition 8 because, even when they had yet to come to their current places of support, they knew that altering governing documents for the sole purpose of limiting rights was a bad idea. Mr. Eich apparently felt otherwise.

By all means, defend Mr. Eich's actions and criticize his treatment. But stop lying about who was supposedly his compatriot in the Prop 8 battle. Barack Obama—who also opposed DOMA, backed ENDA and hate crimes legislation, and vowed to repeal Don't Ask Don't Tell—was not on his team.

space gay-comment gay-G-A-Y-post gay-email gay-writer-jeremy-hooper


Your thoughts

comments powered by Disqus

G-A-Y Comments Policy


 
Related Posts with Thumbnails