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12/16/2014

Anti-equality baseball player calls reporter 'a prick' for asking about his anti-equality advocacy

by Jeremy Hooper

Screen Shot 2014-12-16 At 12.35.12 PmMinnesota Twins outfielder Torii Hunter recently recorded a political ad in which he used his baseball fame to advocate for a (failed) gubernatorial candidate and, specifically, his anti-equality stances. This recording followed 2012 comments in which Hunter said he'd be uncomfortable having a gay teammate since he believes "biblically, it's not right."

But now when a reporter dares to mention the beliefs that Hunter holds and the ad that Hunter chose to record—an ad he was only asked to record because he's a famous baseball player, we should note—the player proceeded to berate the reporter in front on his colleagues. He's "a prick," demanded Hunter:

Twins outfielder Torii Hunter calls reporter a 'prick' for bringing up his anti-marriage equality ad; 'I don't even know you, man' [AKSARBENT]

Look, I get why the player wouldn't want to talk about his choice to advocate against fellow American taxpayers who happen to love someone of the same sex. It's a gross thing to choose to do. I'd want to run away from it as well.

But I'm pretty damn tired of people like this acting as if their actions get to exist in a vacuum. This is a man who chose to enter into the political arena, and who chose specifically to back a candidate's exclusionary marriage views. He also went to the press and declared he'd refuse to accept a teammate if the player were gay. He has every right to say these things and to politick in this way, using whatever opportunities are made available to him by virtue of his sports world fame. However, he doesn't get to just run away from these, the beliefs that he chose on his own volition to make public. A reporter has every right to ask him about them, and he has every reason to answer these questions directly. If he was big enough to stand up in the way that he did, then he also has to stand with the views that he chose to highlight.

People who use their platforms in order to foster views that discriminate against others don't get to live in a bubble. Those bubbles could use "a prick" or two.

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